Chinese Zodiac: Introduction

Chinese Zodiac: Introduction

7/2/2016 10:07:45 AM

Chinese Zodiac is popular in several East Asian countries. This column provides you information about this interesting zodiac sign where you can find your other characters or your future.

 

The 12 Animals of the Chinese Zodiac

The Chinese animal zodiac, or shengxiao (/shnng-sshyaoww/ ‘born resembling’), is a repeating cycle of 12 years, with each year being represented by an animal and its reputed attributes. Traditionally these zodiac animals were used to date the years. In order, the 12 animals are: Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, Pig.

 

What is Your Chinese Zodiac Animal Sign

Your Chinese Zodiac sign is derived from your birth year, according to the Chinese lunar calendar. People born in a certain animal year are believed to have attributes of that animal, which could either help or hinder a relationship. An important use of the Chinese Zodiac is to determine if (the signs of) two people are compatible, in a romantic relationship or any kind of relationship.

Those born in January and February take care: Chinese (Lunar) New Year moves between 21 January and February 20. If you were born in January or February, check whether your birth date falls before or after Chinese New Year to know what your Chinese zodiac year is.

   Rat: 2008, 1996, 1984, 1972, 1960

    Ox: 2009, 1997, 1985, 1973, 1961

    Tiger: 2010, 1998, 1986, 1974, 1962

    Rabbit: 2011, 1999, 1987, 1975, 1963

    Dragon: 2012, 2000, 1988, 1976, 1964

    Snake: 2013, 2001, 1989, 1977, 1965

    Horse: 2014, 2002, 1990, 1978, 1966

    Goat: 2015, 2003, 1991, 1979, 1967

    Monkey: 2016, 2004, 1992, 1980, 1968

    Rooster: 2017, 2005, 1993, 1981, 1969

    Dog: 2018, 2006, 1994, 1982, 1970

    Pig: 2019, 2007, 1995, 1983, 1971

It’s Bad Luck When Your Zodiac Year Comes Around!

As the Chinese zodiac recurs every 12 years, your animal year will come around when you are 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, etc.

 According to ancient Chinese superstition, in your birth sign year, he will offend the God of Age, and will have bad luck during that year. The best way to avoid bad luck during this year is by wearing something red given by an elder (relative), such as socks, a neck cord, underwear, a waistband, a bracelet, or an anklet.

Chinese Zodiac Years Have Two Different Starts!

There are two dates a Chinese zodiac year could be said to start on, and neither is January 1! China traditionally uses two calendars: the solar calendar and the lunar calendar.

The traditional solar calendar has 24 fifteen-day solar terms, and the first, called ‘Start of Spring’, falls on February 4 (or 5).

The lunar calendar has 12 or 13 months and starts on Chinese New Year, which is somewhere in the period January 21 to February 20.

Most Chinese people use lunar New Year as the start of the zodiac year. But for fortune telling and astrology, people believe ‘Start of Spring’ is the beginning of the zodiac year.

Chinese Zodiac Origins — Why 12 Animals?

The 12 animals were chosen deliberately, after many revisions. The zodiac animals are either closely related to ancient Chinese people’s daily lives, or have lucky meanings.

The ox, horse, goat, rooster, pig, and dog are six of the main domestic animals raised by Chinese people. The other six animals: rat, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, and monkey are all loved by the Chinese people.

Why in That Order?

The 12 Chinese Zodiac animals are in a fixed order according to Chinese Yin and Yang Theory and perceived attributes.

The yin or the yang of the animals is defined based on the odd or even number of their claws (or toes, hoofs). The animals are then arranged in an alternating (complementary) yin-yang sequence.

Usually an animal has is the same number of claws on its front and rear legs. However the rat has four toes on its fore legs and five on its hind legs. As the old saying goes, “a thing is valued in proportion to its rarity”, so the Rat ranks first of the 12 zodiac animals. It uniquely combines the attributes of odd (yang) and even (yin). 4+5=9, and yang is dominant, so the Rat is classified as odd (yang) overall.

 

Zodiac Animal

 

Toes Per Limb

 

Odd/Even

 

Yin/Yang

Rat

4 front; 5 back

(even and) odd

(yin and) yang

Ox

4

even

yin

Tiger

5

odd

yang

Rabbit

4

even

yin

Dragon

5

odd

yang

Snake

0

even

yin

Horse

1

odd

yang

Goat

4

even

yin

Monkey

5

odd

yang

Rooster

4

even

yin

Dog

5

odd

yang

Pig

4

even

yin

Each animal has symbolic meanings given to it by the ancient Chinese. These animal attributes comes in six contrasting pairs that must be harmonized, like yin and yang, and are the primary factor governing the order of the zodiac. (Presumably the attributes most valued by ancient Chinese are first and so on.) The strong yang attribute comes first, then the balancing yin attribute.

 

Zodiac Animal

 

Attribute

 

Saying

Rat

Wisdom

Wisdom without industriousness leads to triviality.

Ox

Industriousness

Industriousness without wisdom leads to futility.

Tiger

Valor

Valor without caution leads to recklessness.

Rabbit

Caution

Caution without valor leads to cowardice.

Dragon

Strength

Strength without flexibility leads to fracture.

Snake

Flexibility

Flexibility without strength leads to compromise.

Horse

Forging ahead

Forging ahead without unity leads to abandonment.

Goat

Unity

Unity without forging ahead leads to stagnation.

Monkey

Changeability

Changeability without being constant leads to foolishness.

Rooster

Being constant

Being constant without changeability leads to woodenness.

Dog

Fidelity

Fidelity without amiability leads to rejection.

Pig

Amiability

Amiability without fidelity leads to immorality.

Chinese Zodiac Hours

It is widely known that each year is associated with a Chinese zodiac animal, but in Chinese culture the 12 zodiac animals are also associated with hours of a day.

In ancient times, in order to tell the time, people divided a day into twelve 2-hour periods, and designated an animal to represent each period, according to each animal’s “special time”.

According to Chinese astrology, though not popularly used, a person’s personality and life is more decided by his/her birth hour than year. The zodiac hour is widely used for character and destiny analysis.

 

Rat

 

Ox

 

Tiger

 

Rabbit

 

Dragon

 

Snake

 

Horse

 

Goat

 

Monkey

 

Rooster

 

Dog

 

Pig

11pm

1am

3am

5am

7am

9am

11am

1pm

3pm

5pm

7pm

9pm

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

1am

3am

5am

7am

9am

11am

1pm

3pm

5pm

7pm

9pm

11pm

 You can find more specific information about your animal at Horoscope.tips